Kween Krush: ELLIE ANGEL-MOBBS “I’m An Endo Warrior!”

Kween Krush: ELLIE ANGEL-MOBBS “I’m An Endo Warrior!”

Kween Krush alert!! This is where we celebrate everyday women for being complete badass Wonder Women.

Ellie, we have a crush on you because you have over-come challenges that have defeated many, you also continue to face these challenges head-on daily while keeping a kick-ass radio job, being a wife, friend and sister/warrior to the endometriosis community.

So firstly, what is endometriosis?

It’s a condition that affects 1 in 10 women, creates extreme pain and can lead to infertility. In doc speak – endometriosis is when the tissue similar to the lining of the uterus occurs outside this layer and causes pain and/or infertility. There is no cure. In normal speak – it hurts.

What’s your story/experience with endometriosis? When did you first find out you had it?

When I was 15 I got my first period. I vividly remember getting it and thinking “Oh shit, Mrs Martin taught us about this in Sex Ed noooooo, does this mean I have to grow up now? I don’t want it!!” I was so embarrassed that I didn’t want to tell my Mum but she knew something was wrong. I was acting unusually quiet and kept asking for paracetamol. She eventually said “Ellie, have you got your period?”. I burst into tears. My mum’s a nurse and at the time a mid-wife, so she knew everything when it came to lady issues.  She told me that she had this thing called endometriosis and that it made her very sick when she was young. It eventually led her to have a hysterectomy in her early 30s which is ridiculously young to be going through menopause. It can be hereditary and that there is a high chance I would have it (JOY!!!!!). I went onto having painful periods throughout my teens and the doctor put me on the pill when I was 17. It brought me no relief.

When I was 26, I woke up one morning feeling a bit off. I felt this sharp stabbing pain in my lower stomach. I laid on the bed in the foetal position to ease it, and 2 minutes later I couldn’t move. The pain was so intense. My husband raced home and took me to the emergency doctor. 15 minutes later I was on standby for surgery. They thought my appendix was about to blow, so they rushed me in for a CT scan. What they found was a surprise. Cysts on my ovaries and all signs pointing to endometriosis.

Within weeks I was seeing one of Sydney’s best gynaecologists and having a laproscopy. That’s key hole surgery where they look around your abdomen and fossick to see what jewels they can find. My body was a gold mine: stage 4 endometriosis, the worst you can have. It was growing everywhere – uterus, bowel, ovaries, kidney, it even suffocated my poor little appendix. They also discovered I have a condition called adenomyosis, where the endo tissue grows into the wall of my uterus. And that little sucker hurts! My surgeon described it as a badly bruised apple that will never heal and told me I’d have to have a hysterectomy soon. They also said “Have a baby ASAP”. Sure, because making a baby is as easy as cooking 2 minute noodles!! Since then I’ve had over 10 surgical procedures, and numerous hospital visits and days waiting in doctor’s rooms. It just has become the norm. At the moment though, I’m feeling on top of it and can manage the pain.

Considering there wasn’t as much awareness about it back then as there is now (thanks to Kweens like yourself), how did you become more informed about it?

Not only did my Mum have it, but so did her sisters. There is a very strong link in families with Endo. Mum is so clued on with the medical stuff (she should be a doctor) and therefore I have had extensive knowledge as to how it works and how to best treat it. Endometriosis Australia do a fantastic job educating on it as well. I highly recommend checking out their site.

How did endo change your world? And was it a hard at first to get through your day-to-day life?

It took a toll on my work, social life and mental health. At first diagnosis I had days in really bad places, but I started seeing a professional who really helped me get back on track. A healthy lifestyle with regular exericse and a good diet have a big impact on it. My husband is my rock and my world, he has held my hand through everything. He will do anything to help me, as will my family. I am very lucky.

What exactly is a ‘day in the life’ of someone who has endo?

On a day when the pain is extremely bad, (think of it like someone is grating your cervix, stabbing your uterus with a rough knife or rocks stuck in your bowel) you will spend it in bed, cuddling a hot water bottle and taking whatever you can to stop the pain. Then again some days, not even the hardcore pain killers will touch the sides.

What frightens you the most about Endo? And what do people still not know about it?

Mental health is a huge one. Recently, I met an endo warrior who just got out of hospital because the pain was too much and she tried to end her life. I heard of one man who lost his sister to suicide after she could not take the endo anymore. Women are killing themselves because of this disease. If you are feeling this way please call Lifeline on 13 11 14, they are amazing. The cost it has on workplaces is staggering. In Australia, each year, endometriosis is estimated to cost $7.7 billion in lost productivity and $2.5 billion in Medicare and direct healthcare costs. I have taken a lot of days off during my initial diagnosis period and post surgeries. In the beginning I felt so guilty every time I was unable to work, but I’m teaching my brain to leave behind the guilt and just focus on getting better.

Who are the #endosisters and #endowarriors?

Endo sisters and warriors are those who are battling the illness, it’s a beautiful community (especially on instagram) that share their stories and support one another. It’s nice to be able to chat to others going through a similar experience because we all understand what it’s like. It’s also fantastic to see so many celebraties talking openly about their experiences, like Lena Dunham and Halsey. When you see them posting about not being able to work and being stuck in bed, it is almost reassuring that it can affect anyone.

Tell us about the exciting announcement that happened on the 6th of December 2017?

I was invited to Parliament House for the official launch of the Parliamentary Friends of Endometriosis Awareness, hosted by Gai Brodtmann MP and Nicole Flint Member for Boothby.

These two amazing women have partnered together with the newly formed ACE team (Australian Coalition Of Endometriosis) which is made up of many of the Endometriosis partners in Australia including Endometriosis Australia, Endo Active, QENDO – Endometriosis Association (Qld) Inc, Pelvic Pain Foundation of Australia and Canberra Endometriosis Network.

As an endo warrior, I told my story of pain, surgeries and mental health. For over a decade I have battled this illness and for some reason it really got me that day. I cried during my speech. I was so proud to be standing in front of a powerful group of women, politicians and my Mum and Dad. The Federal Government announced three policies aimed at ending the silence on endometriosis. The average diagnosis time for a woman is 7 years. Just imagine a world where this is drastically shortened, and where this endo thing is just a thing of the past!

Addressing the crowd was Health Minister Greg Hunt MP saying that this chronic women’s health condition should have been given more attention earlier and outlined the Federal Government will now:

• Develop a National action plan for endometriosis. This includes more understanding in workplace scenarios, Medicare rebates and education.

• Fund endometriosis research into diagnosis and treatment at the The University of Queensland – UQ

• Partner with Jean Hailes for Women’s Health to make endometriosis the focus of the next Women’s Health Week.

Bravo! So what’s next in fighting endo? What does the future look like?

On New Year’s Day I was watching the news and a report showed that a research lab in Melbourne may have made a break through. Scientists discovered a new way to find a crucial stem cell in the lining of the womb. With further investigation this could help relieve pain and eventually lead to a cause and cure for it. The future is also about raising awareness (especially in young women) about the symptons of endo. Getting this education into schools would be a huge as well! If girls are educated that it’s not normal to be in so much pain from a period, this can lead to earlier diagnosis.

What do you want to say to anyone who is struggling with endo right now?

Be kind to yourself and know that there is support out there. I think the worst thing about having a chronic illness is just feeling like you are alone and no one understands. But there are people you can talk to. Also if you feel like you are not getting the answers from your GP then seek a second opinion. Some doctors just have no idea about the illness. I am always here for a chat, and to vent about endo. Get in touch @EllieAngel on Twitter. Check out endometriosisaustralia.org for more info, and get involved with their High Teas happening around Australia in March. All money raised goes to endo awareness and research.

Ellie and Carmela randomly met one night through a mutual friend at a radio station in Perth (it was one of those wonderfully drunken cosmic things). It wasn’t long after, that they both got jobs in Sydney and were battling it out hosting different radio shows at the same time. Carmela always admired the shit out of Ellie’s sweet sweet skills and hopes one day hopes to be as slick and cool as her.

@IAmEllieAngelMobbs

Advertisements
Kween Krush: YVIE JONES “You Must Trust Your Gut!”

Kween Krush: YVIE JONES “You Must Trust Your Gut!”

IMG_5514

Kween Krush alert!! This is where we celebrate everyday women for being complete badass Wonder Women.

Yvie, we’ve got a crush on you because simply, you have a heart of freaking gold! Not only do you spend most of your days caring for your housemate Tom but also your 6 dogs (most of which are rescues). Did we also mention you’re pee-your-pants funny? And lucky us, because we got to witness that weekly on ‘I’m a Celebrity Get Me Out Of Here Australia’ with former housemate Angie from the Logie-winning Australian TV showGogglebox.

How did you, Tom and Angie all come to live together?

I had a crazy friend who was getting his masters at Sydney University and he saw an ad on the uni accommodation page offering free rent to two people who would live with a man with down syndrome as carers but act as just ‘housemates’ to him. His name is Tom. The set-up is so Tom can live independently, as he’d never survive a group home. He also has type 1 diabetes, which requires 24 hour care. I met with Tom and we decided to move in. He’s like a brother to me now. Oh, and it turned out that crazy friend was a bit too crazy, so we had to move him on. After living alone with Tom for a year, I roped Angie into moving in. It was pretty hard on her; it’s a hard situation. But she’s done so well and I absolutely love living with her, she keeps me sane and our relationship is incredible. If we could, we’d be lesbians. But you can’t choose your sexuality, can you!

Lol! So, how different is your life from 3 years ago? Highs? Lows? Struggles?

To be honest, not very different at all! Yes, we have 2 Logies, but we don’t get to attend the awards and you only get to hold the statue for half an hour – dumb. Highs have been my relationships. Angie and I have been forced to watch TV shows that we may not necessarily have ever watched, so therefore we’ve talked about things that have really opened our eyes and because of that, we’ve become so close and have a massive understanding of each other. Angie and I get recognised in the streets, which is wonderful. People are just so lovely. We also get told stories by some that we have given them many laughs and they don’t feel lonely anymore, or the only time they smile is when they sit on their couch and watch us. It’s incredibly humbling. Lows? My mum died less than a year ago and that saw my floor falling away beneath me. I’ve never felt that kind of pain before. And it just stays with you. I just wish I could pick up the phone and call her. I struggle with depression (have for most of my life) and I’m honestly glad I’ve had so much therapy and read so many good books on how to deal with depression, because it’s really helped me deal with my grief for my mum.

Does it make you laugh to think your Mum told you, “You won’t get famous sitting on the couch watching TV?”

When I got ‘Gogglebox’, she was the first person I told and I said, “Do you remember saying that?” She rolled her eyes (as only a mum can) and said “This could only happen to you”.

Bless. Now, we’ve forgotten, your other 6 housemates. The dawwwgs. What made you decide to rescue dogs? And why should other people/families do it?

One day I went to my friend’s birthday lunch at Hugos in the Cross (not there anymore, thanks lockout laws) and I was seated next to a woman who worked for the RSPCA and she was the one who busted ‘puppy mills’. I didn’t know there was such a thing! The stories she told me and the statistics she reeled off had me in tears. I knew from that moment I had to do something. Fostering was the best fit for me. Tom absolutely loves dogs and we have a good house with a backyard. We rescue/foster through Paws and Recover who mostly get calls from emergency departments of people who have OD’d , as well as calls from police stations where dogs have been left behind after a domestic violence incident. Until Paws and Recover came along, there were no charities doing this. Pets would die alone at home because no one knew they were there. Anyone with a safe home, and a love for helping dogs can foster. And if you think ‘but I’d be too heartbroken to let them go’, put your feelings aside and think about the needs of the dog. And if you love the dog that much, then adopt him!

What’s around the corner for you? Musicals? Pantomimes? Cabaret shows? Karaoke competitions?

All of those! I’d really like to get into radio or ‘chat TV’; where it’s me being me. Some acting on our great ABC or SBS programmes has always been a dream of mine. I did go to drama school, so I’ve got a few tricks up my sleeve.

That’s the 5 year plan?

Yep, doing some or all of the above! And still fostering dawgs. Maybe fall in love with a male feminist???

What does being a feminist mean to you?

Being a feminist to me means believing in equal rights for women. Being treated exactly the same as a man and any good or bad that comes with that. Believing girls can be anything that boys can be.

What’s one thing you would tell ‘younger Yvie’?

Stop dieting. Anything you’re waiting to do ‘once you’ve lost weight’, just do it! And don’t give a fuck what others think, even those closest to you. You must trust your gut.

📸: @yvie_jones

🐦: @yviejones

F: @yvie

Yvie is one of Carmela’s favourite people. They met many years ago in the bathrooms of a record label quiz night; it was love at first sight. They bonded over finding male-unicorns, the movie ‘Beaches’ and a good late-night kebab. 

Guest Kween: ANDIE TICKNER “The Roar Truth!”

Guest Kween: ANDIE TICKNER “The Roar Truth!”

22730580_1485899688131852_525817534695069245_n

I stayed in a job that killed my soul.
In fact I stayed in many.
This has nothing to do with the jobs.
It has everything to do with my soul.

My calling.
My path, I’m here to walk in life.
The truth is, I waited far too long.
God knows I had the wake up calls.


They started gentle.
But then they got rough.
The universe showing me that there was an alternative.
Time and time again.
But I chose not to listen.


I thought I’d be able to handle it.
Command the energy to walk through those doors every day and bring my best.
Continue to work longer hours and give my all.


To sacrifice myself for a consistent pay cheque.
Sacrifice my happiness rather than face the fear of the unknown.
Sacrifice my health and mental state because I was too scared to leave.
Continue to fool myself that I could make it work.
Because that’s what we do right?

Until I was done.

Until I knew enough was enough.
Crippled with anxiety.
Overcome with confusion.
Looking for another way. Any way.
Going to the darkest of places.
Struggling to sleep.
Running on empty.
Unable to see the possibilities or ways out.
Until I had no choice but to make a choice.
A life worth living or a life of this?

So I chose a life worth living.

I chose to listen to my heart and follow my purpose.
My passion.
To make a choice to show up as me.
To speak my truth.
To live the life I desire.
To back myself and give it a go.
To step into the unknown.
To live without regrets and what if.
To choose myself.

Did it happen overnight?
Hell no.

Do I have it all figured out?
No.

Were there moments of self doubt and fear?
Yes absolutely. I still get them.

Can I always see the road ahead?
No.

Am I happy?
YES!

Gone is the stress, anxiety, darkness, unhealthy habits and bad relationships.
In its place is someone who is the happiest, calmest and most alive they’ve ever been.
If you find yourself thinking…. that sounds like me.

I promise you, it is easier than you think to make a change.
And guess what? The people and opportunities that come into your world when you align with who you really are and are ready to stand up and speak your truth… well they are just INCREDIBLE.

Check out Andie Tickner’s one woman empire below.

The Roar Truth

www.theroartruth.com

22687542_1482487455139742_603983501311412219_n